Looking For The Dream Of America, By Michael Meade

Looking For The Dream Of America, By Michael Meade

The increasing unrest in the land and intensifying protests in the streets are a necessary lament for a collective dream that has been lost. Not simply the loss of the “American dream” of a consumer society and endless economic growth; but, the loss of the real dream, the dream behind the dream, the dream of an America that has not been yet.

Living On Stolen Time, By Dmitry Orlov

Living On Stolen Time, By Dmitry Orlov

And so whether it is a retiree spending his deficit-financed social security check at the dollar store or a banker spending his bailout-financed bonus on lavish gifts for his trophy girlfriend, or a construction worker drinking his economic stimulus-financed paycheck at the bar, somebody somewhere is getting robbed—and becoming poorer.

The End of Growth Uprising Goes Global, By Richard Heinberg

The End of Growth Uprising Goes Global, By Richard Heinberg

It began in Tunisia and Egypt, then spread throughout the Middle East and North Africa. It spilled into Spain, Greece, and Ireland. It leapfrogged to Wall Street. And this past weekend it erupted in London, Rome, Paris, Tokyo, Taipei, and Sydney. In hundreds of towns and cities around the world the uprising’s refrain is similar: economic misery resulting from fizzling economic growth is leading protesters to question corruption both in governments and in financial institutions, and to demand an end to extreme economic inequality.

Podcast: Chris Martenson Interviews Carolyn Baker: Emotional Resilience

To find meaning and purpose, Carolyn advocates a process called ‘inner transition,’ which focuses the individual on answering two questions: “Who do I want to be?” and “What am I here to do?” The process is about redefining our relationship to work, to each other, and to the world around us – in short, redefining what “prosperity” means. For too many in the recent past, prosperity = money. In a future where many current professions and industries may no longer exist, those who respect the work they do – whatever it is – will find much more fulfillment than those remaining fixated on a specific income level that they may not be able to return to.